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Jessye Norman

Tuesday, January 17, 2017


LA Laywers Phil

January 12

Saturday, January 14 & Sunday, January 15 – LA LAWYERS PHIL ON THE RADIO

LA Laywers PhilLos Angeles Lawyers Philharmonic “We Hold These Truths” Radio Broadcast Saturday, January 14, 2017 Sunday, January 15, 2017 Founder-Conductor Gary S. Greene led the LA Lawyers Philharmonic in California Artists Radio Theatre’s (CART) 2016 recording of Norman Corwin’s We Hold These Truths. The program commemorates the 225th Anniversary of the Bill of Rights and the Constitution of the United States of America. It was directed and produced by CART’s founder Peggy Webber. The radio play was first broadcast 75 years earlier on December 15, 1941, eight days after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The original broadcast was carried by all four radio networks live from the home station of CBS in New York and Hollywood. Norman Corwin produced, directed and wrote the program, with the musical score composed and directed by Bernard Herrmann. Leopold Stokowski and the New York Philharmonic performed the National Anthem and President Roosevelt spoke from the Oval Office at the White House. The Hollywood stars who appeared in the original broadcast were James Stewart, Orson Welles, Lionel Barrymore, Walice Huston, Walter Brennan, Edward Arnold, Edward G. Robinson, Marjorie Main, Bob Burns and Rudy Vallee. The 2016 remake of the iconic broadcast stars Samantha Eggar, Norman Lloyd, Leonard Maltin, Charles Shaughnessey, Michael York, Shelley Long, Rene Auberjonois, Monte Markham, James Lancaster, Phil Proctor, Alice Maltin, Melinda Peterson, Susan Fallendar, Tom Williams, John O’Callaghan, Joe Flood, Richard Herd, Herb Ellis, HM Wynant, Michael C. Ford, Paul Keith and John Harlan. Please tune in, and tell your family, friends and colleagues. The rebroadcast of We Hold These Truths was first aired across the nation on Sirius XM on Channel 148 in December 2016. And, it will be aired again this coming weekend on attorney Tom Girardi’s syndicated public service radio show, “Champions of Justice .” Here is the broadcast schedule for January 14 and 15, 2017: KABC 790 AM (Los Angeles): On the Radio: 790 AM Live Online: http://www.kabc.com Saturday, January 14 at 11 a.m. Sunday, January 15 at 10 p.m. KRLA 870 AM (Los Angeles): On the Radio: 870 AM Live Online: http://www.am870theanswer.com Saturday, January 14 at 5 p.m. Sunday, January 15 at 5 p.m. KTIE 590 AM (San Bernardino): On the Radio: 590 AM Live Online: http://www.am590theanswer.com Saturday, January 14 at 5 p.m. Sunday, January 15 at 8 p.m. KCBQ 1170 AM (San Diego): On the Radio: 1170 AM Live Online: http://am1170theanswer.com Saturday, January 14 at 5 p.m. KTKZ 1380 AM (Sacramento): On the Radio: 1380 AM Live Online: http://am1380theanswer.com Saturday, January 14 at 3 p.m. Sunday, January 15 at 10 p.m. KDOW 1220 AM (San Francisco): On the Radio: 1220 AM Live Online: http://www.kdow.biz Saturday, January 14 at 5 p.m. Sunday, January 15 at 8 p.m. WRC 1260 AM (Washington, DC): On the Radio: 1260 AM Live Online: http://am1260theanswer.com Saturday, January 14 at 2 p.m. Sunday, January 15 at 4 p.m. WNYM 970 AM (New York): On the Radio: 970 AM Live Online: http://am970theanswer.com Sunday, January 15 at 10 a.m. CDs of the recording are available for purchase here .

Guardian

January 15

The Last Supper review – Birtwistle's enigmatic millennial catchup with Christ

City Halls, Glasgow The disciples break bread with Jesus 2,000 years on in an intense drama semi-staged by the BBCSSO – which, like most meals, could have been more balancedThe Last Supper is Harrison Birtwistle’s intense and mysterious “dramatic tableau” — an opera, but more static and more stylised — with a libretto by the late Canadian poet Robin Blaser. It premiered in 2000 and was specifically a millennium piece: it deals with time, the weight we put on single moments (the striking of midnight, the Crucifixion), how we rework those moments in hindsight, how we replay old stories with horrible inevitability and re-enact rituals we would rather escape. Hearing the work in 2017, its depiction of historical amnesia and collective entrapment felt starkly relevant. This is not easy entertainment by anyone’s standards. Birtwistle himself has called it “a tough grub”, and though we all know the story, broadly speaking, the detailed implications are obscure. Time telescopes across two millennia but for two hours nothing much happens. The premise is that Ghost — Greek chorus, conscience of the audience, sung with superb conviction by Susan Bickley — invites the disciples to reconvene for another Last Supper. The men trickle in, greet each other, chat about what they’ve been up to for the past 2,000 years. Judas turns up against the odds and the others shun him; I was deeply moved by Daniel Norman’s diffident and remorseful portrayal. Then Jesus arrives, a tremendously noble and resonant performance from Roderick Williams, and begins to play out Passover events. Continue reading...




On An Overgrown Path

January 5

Music that matters in the 21st century

A recent post about Warner's re-issue of André Previn conducting the three great Tchaikovsky ballets generated much interest. So now I am highlighting another Warner reissue well worth seeking out. Daniel Barenboim's account with the English Chamber Orchestra of Mozart's piano concertos was originally recorded by EMI in Studio 1 Abbey Road with Suvi Raj Grubb as producer, and the transfer onto 10 CDs is now an astonishing bargain at sub-budget price. The recordings were made in the late 1960s and early 1970s long before Brand Barenboim became classical music's equivalent of Brand Beckham. So this is music and music making that speaks directly to our times without gratuitous intermediation. Any reader still in doubt as to Norman Lebrecht's credentials as a cultural commentator is referred to his legendary 2005 appreciation of Mozart. Norman's laudation can be read via this link and his concluding paragraph is extracted below. Mozart is a menace to musical progress, a relic of rituals that were losing relevance in his own time and are meaningless to ours. Beyond a superficial beauty and structural certainty, Mozart has nothing to give to mind or spirit in the 21st century. Let him rest. Ignore the commercial onslaught. Play the Leningrad Symphony. Listen to music that matters.No review samples used in this post. Any copyrighted material is included as "fair use" for critical analysis, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s). Reluctantly also on Facebook and Twitter.



Jessye Norman

Jessye Norman (September 15, 1945) is an American opera singer. Norman is a well-known contemporary opera singer and recitalist, and is one of the highest paid performers in classical music. A dramatic soprano, Norman is associated in particular with the roles of Aïda, Cassandre, Alceste, and Leonore.



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